Corona (COVID-19) Information Portal

Welcome to Welwitschia Hospital’s Covid-19 Information Portal for information and care you can trust. All information shared on this site has been sourced from reputable sources including the World Health Organization (WHO) website

Number of Confirmed Covid-19 Cases
129067
Number of Reported Covid-19 Recoveries
125366
Number of Covid-19 Related Deaths
3565

These numbers were updated 16\11\2021 at 09:52am

COVID-19 VACCINATION PROCEDURES:

The vaccination procedures and information outlined below apply to the Walvis Bay, Welwitschia Hospital catchment area only. Although the vaccines and vaccination site is brought to you by the Ministry of Health and Social Services and not Welwitschia Hospital, we hope that sharing the correct, relevant information with our community will help facilitate a good vaccination experience for all.

When and Where can I get Vaccinated?

The Ministry of Health & Social Services will be administering Covid vaccines at Welwitschia Hospital’s old Covid Casualty area (behind BRG Biokinetics, Walvis Bay) every weekday between the hours of 9 am and 4 pm.

Which Vaccines are available at this vaccination site?

Available
PHIZER
Available
AstraZeneca
Available
JOHNSON & JOHNSON
Available
SINOPHARM

This information was updated on 24\11\2021 at 09:35am. 

If you have any further questions regarding the vaccine options available to you, please contact your GP here.

What procedures do I need to follow to get vaccinated?

  • The vaccination site is open for all who have a valid ID/Passport and are over the age of 18.
  • Children aged between 12-17 years of age are eligible to receive the Phizer vaccine.
  • No need to pre-register, the vaccines are administered at a first come, first serve basis daily.
  • In order to get your vaccination, you will be required to have the documentation in the below, printed and completed.
  • Parents/Guardians are required to sign the consent form of children aged between 12-17 years of age.
  • Bring your ID/ Passport and completed forms with to the vaccination site.
  • Please note that vaccines are currently only administered if your blood pressure is at an acceptable level (120/80). To avoid disappointment at the vaccination site, we strongly suggest those with possible blood pressure afflictions have it checked beforehand.
  • Individuals coming for their second dose
    • Should please bring their Vaccination Certificate with
    • Should return on the indicated date, or slightly later, but please not earlier.

Please download Relevant Forms required for completion here:

If you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact the Ministry on their toll-free number 0800 100 100 (Nationwide) or WhatsApp 0851 100 100. Alternatively, get in touch with us at hello@welwitschiahospital.com or 064 218 911 / 064 218 902.

We are so pleased to see more and more of our community members coming for their vaccinations. Let’s keep it up & save lives

VACCINATION FAQ’S:

Who should get the COVID vaccine?

Most people 18 years and older, including those with pre-existing conditions and auto-immune disorders, are eligible for COVID-19 Vaccinations. These pre-existing conditions include: diabetes, asthma, pulmonary, liver and kidney disease, as well as chronic infections that are stable and controlled.

If you are unsure whether it’s safe for you to get a vaccine, discuss your situation with your local healthcare provider. Including those who:

  • Have a compromised immune system
  • Are pregnant or nursing your baby
  • Have a history of severe allergies, particularly to a vaccine (or any of the ingredients in the vaccine)
  • Are severely frail

What are the benefits of getting vaccinated?

Developing immunity through vaccination means there is a reduced risk of developing the illness and its consequences. This immunity helps you fight the virus if exposed.

Even though there is a small chance of contracting the virus after being vaccinated, (called ‘break through’ infection) which can happen with any other vaccine, the severity and symptoms you experience may be less severe.

Thus, the vaccine is also likely to substantially reduce the chance of transmitting the virus to others which is important in protecting other immune-compromised individuals in your community.

Can we stop taking precaution after being vaccinated?

For the first fourteen days after getting a vaccination, you do not have significant levels of protection, then it increases gradually. For a single dose vaccine, immunity will generally occur two weeks after vaccination. For two-dose vaccines, both doses are needed to achieve the highest level of immunity possible.

While a COVID-19 vaccine can protect you from serious illness and death, we are still learning about the extent to which it keeps you from being infected and passing the virus on to others (transmission). The data that is emerging from countries is showing that the vaccines that are currently in use are protecting against severe disease and hospitalization. However, no vaccine is 100% effective and breakthrough infections are regrettable, but to be expected.

The current evidence shows that vaccines provide some protection from infection and transmission, but better protection from serious illness and death. We are still learning also about the variants of concern and whether the vaccines are as protective against these strains as the non-variant virus.  For these reasons, and while many of those in the community may not yet be vaccinated, maintaining other prevention measures is important especially in communities where SARS CoV-2 circulation is significant. To help keep you and others safe, and while efforts continue to reduce viral transmission and ramp up vaccine coverage, you should continue to maintain at least a 1,5-metre distance from others, cover a cough or sneeze in your elbow, clean your hands frequently and wear a mask, particularly in enclosed, crowded or poorly ventilated spaces. Always follow guidance from local authorities based on the situation and risk where you live.

What are the side effects of COVID-19 vaccines?

Like any vaccine, COVID-19 vaccines can cause mild, short term side effects, such as a low-grade fever or pain or redness at the injection site. Most reactions to vaccines are mild and go away within a few days on their own. More serious or long-lasting side effects to vaccines are possible but extremely rare. Vaccines are continually monitored for as long as they are in use, to detect rare adverse events and implement approaches to limit their occurrence.

Reported side effects to COVID-19 vaccines have mostly been mild to moderate and short-lasting. They include: fever, fatigue, headache, muscle pain, chills, diarrhoea,C and pain at the injection site. The chances of any of these side effects following vaccination differ according to the specific COVID-19 vaccine.

In most cases, these can be managed with rest, plenty of non-alcoholic liquids, and paracetamol/acetaminophen for the typical side effects. Contact your care provider if the tenderness (pain) where you got the injection increases after 24 hours, or the side effects do not go away within a couple days. If you have difficulty breathing, chest pain, confusion, loss of speech or mobility, call a healthcare provider immediately.

Should I be vaccinated if I have had COVID-19?

Even if you have already had COVID-19, you should be vaccinated when it is offered to you. The protection that someone gains from having COVID-19 will vary from person to person, and we also don’t know how long natural immunity might last. If you’re not sure, do contact your healthcare provider or one of our GP’s here.

Should I take a blood thinner a few days before the vaccine, given reports of blood clotting caused by the vaccination?

No, you should not take a blood thinner unless your healthcare provider has prescribed that medication to treat an existing health condition. Covid-19 vaccines are safe for people taking blood thinners but you should let the person giving you the vaccine know about any medication you are taking BEFORE you are given the vaccine.

Is it possible that someone vaccinated against COVID-19 will still get infected?

While COVID-19 vaccines have high levels of efficacy, especially against hospitalization and severe disease, no vaccine is 100% protective. As a result, there will be some small percentage of vaccinated people who fall ill with COVID-19 in spite of being vaccinated.

In addition to a vaccine’s specific characteristics, several factors such as a person’s age, their underlying health conditions, previous COVID-19 disease, current exposure to SARS-CoV-2, or the circulation of virus variants may have an impact on a vaccine’s effectiveness. We do not yet know how long immunity from different COVID-19 vaccines will last. That is one reason why, even as COVID-19 vaccines are being rolled out, we must continue using all public health measures that work to decrease exposure risk, such as physical distancing, masks, and handwashing.

For the first 14 days after getting vaccinated, you do not have significant levels of protection as the protection increases gradually. For a single dose vaccine, protection is generally considered to occur by two weeks after vaccination. For two-dose vaccines, both doses are needed to achieve the highest level of immunity possible.

While a COVID-19 vaccine is most effective against serious illness and death, we are still learning about their ability to protect you from getting infected and passing the virus on to others. New research conducted in the UK has shown that transmission of COVID-19 is reduced by 40% to 50% with the AstraZeneca vaccination. To help keep yourself and others safe, and while vaccination rolling out in your community, continue to maintain at least a one-and-a-half-meter distance from others, cover a cough or sneeze in your elbow, clean your hands frequently and wear a mask, particularly in enclosed, crowded or poorly ventilated spaces. Always follow guidance from local authorities based on the situation and risk where you live.

Is it safe for pregnant women, those planning to become pregnant, and breastfeeding mothers to receive COVID-19 vaccines?

Information on the safety of the COVID-19 vaccinations in pregnant women is still limited. Officially , and in the interim, WHO recommends that for pregnant women the use of the COVID-19 vaccine be considered on the basis of a benefit vs risk assessment. To help pregnant women make this assessment, they should be provided with information about the risks of COVID-19 in pregnancy, the likely benefits of vaccination in the local epidemiological context, and WHO does not recommend pregnancy testing prior to vaccination. WHO does not recommend delaying pregnancy or terminating pregnancy because of vaccination.

Vaccination with any of the vaccine products that have been assessed by the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization can be offered to breastfeeding women. WHO does not recommend discontinuation of breastfeeding after vaccination. More evidence will continue to be sought in order to further inform WHO’s policy recommendations on this subject.

At Welwitschia Hospital, and in times of a pandemic wave, our recommendation is for those who are pregnant to be vaccinated in either their 2nd or 3rd trimester.

Are COVID-19 vaccines safe for people living with HIV?

Information on the safety of the COVID-19 vaccinations in pregnant women is still limited. Officially , and in the interim, WHO recommends that for pregnant women the use of the COVID-19 vaccine be considered on the basis of a benefit vs risk assessment. To help pregnant women make this assessment, they should be provided with information about the risks of COVID-19 in pregnancy, the likely benefits of vaccination in the local epidemiological context, and WHO does not recommend pregnancy testing prior to vaccination. WHO does not recommend delaying pregnancy or terminating pregnancy because of vaccination.

Vaccination with any of the vaccine products that have been assessed by the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization can be offered to breastfeeding women. WHO does not recommend discontinuation of breastfeeding after vaccination. More evidence will continue to be sought in order to further inform WHO’s policy recommendations on this subject.

At Welwitschia Hospital, and in times of a pandemic wave, our recommendation is for those who are pregnant to be vaccinated in either their 2nd or 3rd trimester.

Note: The majority of the information above was received from the WHO Q&A Hub which you can consult for further information here. All FAQ images are sourced from freepik.com.

COVID-19 ONLINE RISK ASSESSMENT TOOL:

Not sure whether you require a COVID-19 clinical assessment or test? Please take our online Risk Assessment Questionnaire here

INFORMATION YOU CAN TRUST:

Unfortunately, we are again needing to revise our visiting hours. The third, and most severe of the COVID-19 waves is upon us and we are seeing exponential increases in the daily cases in the country. As a result, we will need to revert back to the suspension of all visiting hours as was applied during the first and second COVID-19 waves, with exceptions as detailed below. We will review the scenario on a regular basis, and where possible, make changes.

As of 20:00 pm on Monday 14 June 2021, Welwitschia Hospital suspends all visiting hours for its General Ward, Surgical Ward, Adult Intensive Care Unit, Casualty and Outpatient Department. The only exceptions will be made for the below wards with related protocols:

Neonatal ICU:

  • The mother of the newborn will be allowed to stay (not visit) in hospital.
  • Only the father of the newborn is allowed to visit the mother and newborn admitted in the hospital.
  • This is only allowed on the condition that the parents passed the screening at the entrance, has had no COVID-19 exposure and accepts that very strict infection prevention controls will be put in place to minimise the risk to their and other newborns being cared for in our facility.
  • Parents must not walk around or congregate with other individuals.
  • No other visitors will be allowed to visit.

Paediatric Ward:

  • Only one parent will be allowed to stay (not visit) with their admitted child in hospital. Parents may rotate every 24 hours.
  • This is only allowed on the condition that the parent passed the screening at the entrance, has had no COVID-19 exposure and accepts that very strict infection prevention controls will be put in place to minimise the risk to their child and other children being cared for in our facility.
  • The parent must stay in the room and at the bedside, not walk around or congregate with other individuals.
  • No other visitors will be allowed to visit.

Maternity Ward:

  • Only the partner of the patient is allowed to visit.
  • This is only allowed on the condition that he/she passed the screening at the entrance, has had no COVID-19 exposure and accepts that very strict infection prevention controls will be put in place to minimise the risk to other patients being cared for in our facility.
  • Visitors must not walk around or congregate with other individuals.
  • No other visitors will be allowed to visit.

Day Ward:

  • One person will be allowed to accompany a patient who will be going for a theatre procedure, to the Day Ward, until they are admitted and settled.
  • This is only allowed on the condition that he/she passed the screening at the entrance, has had no COVID-19 exposure and accepts that very strict infection prevention controls will be put in place to minimise the risk to other patients being cared for in our facility.
  • Once the patient is back from theatre and ready to be discharged, the ward will contact the accompanying person to collect the patient.
  • For children, only one parent will be allowed to stay with their child in hospital until the child is ready to be discharged, post surgery.

Exemptions will be made for gravely ill patients. Only the Nursing Manager on-call can grant an exemption. Kindly note that only a minimal number of visitors will be allowed regardless of an exemption granted.

We trust that you will understand that these measures are in the best interest of your loved ones and other immune-compromised patients who are more susceptible to the spreading of COVID-19. We thank you for your cooperation in this challenging time. In the meantime, please do not hesitate to call upon our staff to assist in the delivery of any personal items to inpatients.

You can reduce your chances of being infected or spreading COVID-19 by taking all of the below-outlined precautions:

Wash Your Hands Thoroughly & Regularly

Washing your hands has still proven to be the biggest guard against the spread of the disease. As your hands come into contact with many germs, washing your hands with soap and water or using a 70% plus alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that may be on your hands.

Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water for 20 seconds. Dry your hands after each wash with a single-use paper cloth (and dispose of this paper cloth appropriately) or a clean towel.

Please still remember to use water sparingly. Water is a precious, life-giving resource. Please turn off the taps while you wash your hands and use the tap at a lower pressure flow if possible.

Maintain social distancing

In order to slow the spread of the disease, it is of the utmost importance for us a population to practice social distancing. Social distancing guidelines say that we must maintain at least 1 metre (3 feet) distance between ourselves and someone else. Avoiding contact with others, whether they are infected or not, will help to slow the transmission of the disease.

Social distancing also allows us to avoid the spray of small liquid droplets from those who are coughing and sneezing. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person coughing has the disease.

Maintaining social distancing, even if you do not have any symptoms, is key to slowing the curve.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth

It is important to note that the virus can live on everyday items and surfaces. We touch so many surfaces on a daily basis and these items and surfaces may be infected with the virus. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and can make you sick.

Most of the time, face touching is done so as a force of habit, unknowingly, and thus it is important to make a conscious effort to avoid touching your face, even after washing or sanitizing your hands.

Practice respiratory hygiene

As we know, the droplets from people coughing and sneezing are one of the ways that the virus is spread and thus you need to make sure that you, and the people around you, practice good respiratory hygiene.

This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. If you are using tissues, make sure that once used, you dispose of the used tissue immediately. By following good respiratory hygiene, you can protect yourself and those around you from colds, cases of flu and COVID-19.

Wear a mask to prevent the spread

Masks are effective in preventing the spread of COVID-19, but only when used in combination with frequent hand-cleaning with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water. And if you are wearing a mask you must know how to dispose of it properly.

The WHO suggests that those with COVID-19 and COVID-19 symptoms are mandated to wear a mask to prevent the spread of the virus. A strong case is, however, being made for the public to also wear masks in solidarity when outside of their homes especially in areas with many COVID-19 cases. This curbs the spread by potential COVID-19 positive patients carrying the disease unknowingly due to a lack of symptoms or confirmed tests.

Due to a worldwide shortage of surgical (medical) masks or N-95 that are required for use in hospital & the intimate treatment of COVID-19 patients, wearing your own (correctly) home-made or cloth masks or other alternatives is a good substitute and strongly encouraged.  Cloth homemade masks have the added bonus of being reusable after wash as you would any other cotton materials: in your washing machine or by hand at 60 degrees Celsius hot water & washing powder.

See an easy instruction guide reusing an old Cotton T-Shirt and shoestrings to make a mask here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lD4wi3b8jTI

How to use cloth masks correctly:

  • Use only if the mask has been washed or ironed.
  • Before putting on a mask, clean hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water.
  • Place your mask with the correct side facing your face, ensure that it covers both your mouth and nose properly.
  • Secure the mask with the strings behind your head, or the elastic bands. Make sure these are tight.
  • Make sure it fits properly and move it around to get the best fit. Avoid leaving any or big gaps between your face and the mask and never touch the cloth part of the mask.
  • Once the mask is on, do not touch your face again until it is removed. If you do touch the cloth part of the mask, clean your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water.
  • Replace the mask with a new one as soon as it is damp and do not re-use single-use masks.
  • To remove the mask: remove it from behind (do not touch the front of the mask); turn it inside out and hold it by the strings / elastic and place it in a safe container reserved for washing the face mask.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly and dry them after them before doing anything else.
  • Wash your cloth masks with warm, soapy water and iron when dry.

Keep good general hygiene and disinfect surfaces.

It is incredibly important to keep up with general hygiene and wash your hands as frequently as possible. It is also very important to clean and disinfect your households’ common areas and high-touch surfaces (especially if there is suspected infection risk).

High-touch surfaces include tables, chairs, doorknobs, phones, remote controls, touch screens, keyboards etc. Keeping up with general hygiene and disinfecting surfaces will help to slow the spread of the virus and this is incredibly important in keeping you, and your family safe.

Avoid wearing gloves

The regular washing of hands or using appropriate sanitisers have proven to be more effective in curbing the spread of COVID-19 by the public than wearing gloves.

Gloves are meant to be used in clinical environments by medical professionals to avoid cross-contamination and are to be discarded after every interaction. This is because gloves carry germs that are picked up from one surface to the next – like a trolley, a phone, your supplies and your face.

The COVID-19 test results should take about 2-3 days. You do not have to return to the testing facility to get the results – your doctor or the laboratory will contact you. Please make sure they have your correct address and phone number so that they can contact you. Until the results are received, you should please consider yourself infected until you are given the “all clear” by the Ministry of Health and follow the Self-Isolation Guidelines outlined below.

It is important to note that severe disease only occurs in a small percentage of patients and that most cases of COVID-19 can safely be managed at home in consultation with your General Practitioner (GP) & by following the Self-Isolation Guidelines outlined below.

For sound medical assessment and advice, please contact and consult with your local GP. We urge you to please refrain from self-presenting to hospitals, GP practices or pharmacies. As far as possible, please call in advance if you require urgent hospital care, need to book consultations or collect scripts.

Around 1 out of every 6 people who get COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and also develops difficulty breathing. People with fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, please contact and consult with your local GP.

Those with mild symptoms can manage the symptoms at home by resting, keeping hydrated and taking paracetamol or over the counter flu medication. Children should only use paracetamol.

If you live alone or can isolate yourself from others in the house please follow the below guidelines:

  • Please stay at home
  • Accept no visitors
  • No family gatherings
  • Do not make any trips to the school, university, work, park, library, movies, church, the doctor, chemist or even hospital without an appointment.
  • Isolate yourself in a separate, well-ventilated room at home.
  • If possible, use a separate bathroom and/or toilet.
  • If there is only 1 toilet in the household, ensure you clean the toilet seat, flusher, tap, sink, door handles and any other surface that may have been touched each time it has been used by the person who is sick.
  • After using the toilet, please close the lid before you flush and then wash your hands.  The virus can be detected in faeces and closing the lid before flushing reduces the risk of the virus becoming airborne and spreading the infection further.
  • The same applies to the showers/baths.

Around 1 out of every 6 people who get COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and also develops difficulty breathing. People with fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, please contact and consult with your local GP. It is important to note that severe disease only occurs in a small percentage of patients and that most cases of COVID-19 can safely be managed at home.

We urge you to please refrain from self-presenting to hospitals, GP practices or pharmacies and to refrain from any physical contact with elderly people, people with lung disease or any person with a compromised immune system due to acute or chronic disease.

As far as possible, please call in advance if you require urgent hospital care, need to book consultations or collect scripts.

If you are older than 65 years of age, have underlying chronic illnesses or immunosuppressed states please see to contact your doctor or Pharmacist prior to any health care visit to confirm whether the benefit of a physical consultation outweighs the risk of possibly contracting the virus when out and about.

If you have any other medical or script related concerns whatsoever, please do not hesitate to contact Welwitschia Hospitalyour local GP or Pharmacist.

Pregnant women or recently pregnant women who are older, overweight, and have pre-existing medical conditions such as hypertension and diabetes seem to have an increased  risk of developing severe COVID-19. When pregnant women develop severe disease, they also seem to more often require care in intensive care units than non-pregnant women of reproductive age.

Due to changes in their bodies and immune systems, we know that pregnant women can be badly affected by some respiratory infections. It is therefore important that they take precautions to protect themselves against COVID-19, and report possible symptoms (including fever, cough or difficulty in breathing) to their healthcare provider.

It is however still uncertain whether a pregnant woman with COVID-19 can pass the virus to her foetus or baby during pregnancy or delivery. To date, the virus has not been found in samples of amniotic fluid or breastmilk.

Pregnant women should take the same precautions to avoid COVID-19 infection as other people and if they have any of the COVID-19 related symptoms seek medical attention early. See our risk assessment questionnaire for more information. Please remember to not self-present at health facilities if you are potentially COVID-19 positive, but to phone the relevant facility in advance to set up your clinical assessment appointment.

It’s also important for the health of the mother and the baby that all pregnant women and women who have recently delivered – including those affected by COVID-19 – to attend their routine care appointments. 

Many women also ask how does COVID-19 affects their birthing & breastfeeding plans.  According to the World Health Organisation all pregnant women, including those with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 infections, have the right to high-quality care before, during and after childbirth. This includes antenatal, newborn, postnatal, intrapartum and mental health care.

A safe and positive childbirth experience includes:

  • Being treated with respect and dignity
  • Having a companion of choice present during delivery
  • Clear communication by maternity staff
  • Appropriate pain relief strategies
  • Mobility in labour where possible, and birth position of choice

You’re also not required to give birth via caesarean section if expected that you are positive with COVID-19. The mode of birth should still be individualized and based on a woman’s preferences alongside obstetric indications.

Another important question is whether you can still breastfeed with a COVID-19 infection. Again the WHO advises YES if you wish to, as close contact and early, exclusive breastfeeding helps your newborn to thrive. Important precautions a COVID-19 patient must take during breastfeeding:

  • Practice good respiratory hygiene during feeding by wearing a mask
  • Wash hands before and after touching your baby
  • Routinely clean and disinfect surfaces they have touched

If you are too unwell to breastfeed your baby due to COVID-19 or other complications, you should be supported to safely provide your baby with breastmilk in a way possible, available, and acceptable to you. This could include:

  • Expressing milk
  • Relactation
  • Donor human milk

We, as a community, and a country as a whole is making huge changes to our lives & sacrifices of foregoing our comforts and freedoms to save precious lives and reduce the number of people being infected by COVID-19.

Looking after your and your loved ones’ mental health is an important part of seeing us through this pandemic. Below are a few tips outlined by the World Health Organisation on doing exactly this. However, if you or someone you know have the need to reach out to someone during this time please know that our doctors are able to conduct remote consultations. Please don’t hesitate to contact your GP.

Our new realities include working from home, temporary unemployment, home-schooling our children, and lack of physical contact with other family members, friends and colleagues and it will take time to get used to. Adapting to lifestyle changes such as these, and managing the fear of contracting the virus and worry about people close to us who are particularly vulnerable, are challenging for all of us. They can be particularly difficult for people with mental health conditions.

Fortunately, there are lots of things that we can do to look after our own mental health and to help others who may need some extra support and care. 

Keep informed. Listen to advice and recommendations from your national and local authorities. Follow trusted news channels, such as local and national TV and radio, and keep up-to-date with the latest news from @WHO on social media.

Have a routine. Keep up with daily routines as far as possible, or make new ones.  

  • Get up and go to bed at similar times every day.
  • Keep up with personal hygiene.
  • Eat healthy meals at regular times.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Allocate time for working and time for resting.
  • Make time for doing the things you enjoy.

Minimize newsfeeds. Try to reduce how much you watch, read or listen to news that makes you feel anxious or distressed. Seek the latest information at specific times of the day, once or twice a day if needed. 

Social contact is important. If your movements are restricted, keep in regular contact with people close to you by telephone and online channels.

Alcohol and drug use. Limit the amount of alcohol you drink or don’t drink alcohol at all. Don’t start drinking alcohol if you have not drunk alcohol before. Avoid using alcohol and drugs as a way of dealing with fear, anxiety, boredom and social isolation.

There is no evidence of any protective effect of drinking alcohol for viral or other infections. In fact, the opposite is true as the harmful use of alcohol is associated with increased risk of infections and worse treatment outcomes.

And be aware that alcohol and drug use may prevent you from taking sufficient precautions to protect yourself against infection, such as compliance with hand hygiene.

Screen time. Be aware of how much time you spend in front of a screen every day. Make sure that you take regular breaks from on-screen activities.

Video games. While video games can be a way to relax, it can be tempting to spend much more time on them than usual when at home for long periods. Be sure to keep the right balance with off-line activities in your daily routine.

Social media. Use your social media accounts to promote positive and hopeful stories. Correct misinformation wherever you see it.

Help others. If you are able to, offer support to people in your community who may need it, such as helping them with food shopping.

Support health workers. Take opportunities online or through your community to thank your country’s health-care workers and all those working to respond to COVID-19. 

Don’t discriminate. Fear is a normal reaction in situations of uncertainty. But sometimes fear is expressed in ways which are hurtful to other people. Remember:  

  • Be kind. Don’t discriminate against people because of your fears of the spread of COVID-19. 
  • Don’t discriminate against people who you think may have Coronavirus.
  • Don’t discriminate against health workers. Health workers deserve our respect and gratitude now more than ever.
  • COVID-19 has affected people from many countries. Don’t attribute it to any specific group.

For more information and tips, please visit the World Health Organisation Website <links here: https://www.who.int/news-room/campaigns/connecting-the-world-to-combat-coronavirus/healthyathome/healthyathome—mental-health>

Let’s not forget to still take care of others and our environment during the fight against COVID-19.

Please ensure that you dispose of any possibly infected materials and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) carefully and correctly to stop further spread of the disease. After use, all PPE has to carefully be disposed of in a plastic bag and discarded into a general waste bin so that no one else or yourself can pick up the infection from incorrectly discarded materials.

Please still remember to use water sparingly. Water is a precious, life-giving resource. Please turn off the taps while you wash your hands and use the tap at a lower pressure flow if possible.

Please know that we have only used sources on this page that we trust to be medically sound. Please guard against fake news and ensure you stay informed with the right information.

Additional Information Sources:

Important Contact Information